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FORGET SCALIA. DEATH COULD COME FOR THREE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (SCUSA) SOON ENOUGH.

With the death of Supreme Court of the United States of America (SCUSA) justice Antonin Scalia, politicians and pundits have gone into overtime arguing over the merits and demerits of blocking any Obama nomination. Democrats demand that an Obama nomination should be vetted quickly and confirmed. Republicans demand that Obama must be thwarted and thus leaving it up to the next president.

Forget Scalia. His death is but one vacancy. The real story of the SCUSA is the aged state of three justices — Kennedy, Ginsburg and Breyer.



It's likely that all three either die or become incapacitated over the next eight years. So whoever gets sworn in as president in January, 2017, likely will put three new judges on the SCUSA and thus change the trajectory of law-of-the-land legal rulings for decades to come.

All three aforementioned judges are either nearing or have past life expectancy for the typical American. Kennedy Is 79 and and a half.  Stephen Breyer is 77 and a half. Ginsburg is a decrepit 82 and 11 months.

Removing those judges from thought, right now the court has three republican nominated judges — Clarence Thomas (67), John G. Roberts (61), Samuel A. Alito (65). Two Democrat nominated judges sit on the court — Sonia Sotomayor (61) and Elena Kagan (55).

The Republicans should not be short-sighted here. They should pressure Obama to nominate a left-of-center judge and then confirm that judge, quickly, but after the ruling session, which maybe ends in June.

The next president needs to nominate three Scalia-type judges to replace Kennedy, Breyer and Ginsburg when their days are done. 

Also, it's time to put a Protestant Christian back on the SCUSA. As it is right now, only Roman Catholics and Jews sit on the US Supreme Court — Catholics: Roberts, Kennedy, Thomas, Alito, Sotomayor; Jews — Ginsburg, Breyer, Kagan.

Yet, American jurisprudence has its basis in Protestant Christian morality and thought. It has nothing from Catholic or Judaic thought.