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WHICH USA CITIES ARE GROWING FASTEST, SLOWING, STAGNATING OR DYING?


Back on May 24, 2018, the U.S. Census Bureau released a work, Reveals Fastest-Growing Large Cities, which highlighted the cities with the fastest growing populations between 2017 and 2016.



According to the U.S. Census Bureau,

10 of the 15 fastest-growing large cities were located in the South, with seven in Texas. Between 2016 and 2017, Frisco, Texas (near Dallas), was the fastest-growing large city (population of 50,000 or more) at 8.2 percent, making its growth rate more than 11 times faster than the nation’s growth rate of 0.7 percent. See below for some of the other fastest-growing large cities.


But year-over-year changes do not reveal much. So I delved into the data for you. First, keep in mind the estimated U.S. population growth rate from 2010 through 2017 is 5.3%.

True Fastest Growing Cities - Twice the Growth 

I don't know about you, but if I were looking to invest in realty, whether commercial realty or rental realty, I would look to these cities. This table reveals cities with greater than twice the growth rate during the last four year relative to the first four years of the decade. Only cities with a growth rate of 10% or more over this decade were considered.





Growing Bigger Cities 

This table reveals cities with populations between 250,000 and 699,000, which had higher growth in the last half of this decade than the first half. Only cities with a growth rate of 10% or more over this decade were considered.




Growing Biggest Cities 

This table reveals cities with populations of 700,000 or more, which had higher growth in the last half of this decade than the first half. Only cities with a growth rate of 10% or more over this decade were considered.




Slowing Cities

This table reveals cities with with slowing growth rates during the last four year relative to the first four years of the decade. Still, many of these cities have experienced impressive growth during this decade.

Only cities cities exceeding the national growth rate of 5.3% are shown.




Stagnant Cities 

This table reveals cities with with population growth rates below the national growth rate of 5.3%, which also had slowing growth rates during the last four years relative to the first four years of the decade.

For some of these cities such as Thousand Oaks, Ventura, Simi Valley, Santa Barbara and Santa Clarita in Southern California, this situation results with high prices for residential realty. This holds true for nearly all of the California cities.

Other cities in this group squeaked out gains owing to immigrants and illegal aliens. Still others are teetering on the brink of becoming dying cities.



Dying Cities

Here is the table that many politicians, real estate agents and homeowners do not want you to see. Dying cities have population declines during the decade as well as population 




All Cities

This table lists all of the cities with populations of 50,000 or more by growth rate from 2010 to 2017.