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THE ESTABLISHMENT'S MEDIA CALLED THE 2017 GEORGIA DISTRICT 6 REPLACEMENT ELECTION A REFERENDUM ON PRESIDENT TRUMP. REPUBLICAN HANDEL WON. WHY DOES ANYONE STILL TAKE SLANTED #FAKENEWS FROM CNN?


When Tom Price vacated his seat in the House of Representatives from Georgia District 6 to become the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services in the cabinet of President Trump, the State of Georgia held a special election in that District to seat his replacement.  The Establishment's media, that is, the anti-Trump, left-leaning voice of the Democratic Party, reported incessantly that this election should be viewed as a referendum on President Trump himself.




After the victory by Republican Karen Handel in the special election for Georgia District 6, CNN anchor Don Lemon said, "What’s interesting is that, breaking news, a Republican wins in Georgia, it shouldn’t be breaking news. This is the way it should happen."

Three counties comprise District 6 in Georgia, Cobb, DeKalb and Fulton. Republican Handel destroyed Ossoff 61% to 39% in Cobb while also winning handily in Fulton, 53% to 47%. In DeKalb, Ossoff beat Handel soundly 58% to 42%.

In the 2016 presidential election, all three counties went for Hillary Clinton. Clinton won Cobb, 47.9% to 45.8%. In DeKalb and Fulton, Clinton destroyed President Trump. Clinton won Fulton, 67.7% vs 26.8%. Clinton won DeKalb by a lopsided 79.1% vs 16.2%.

So it is a rather big deal that Handel won this special election considering the demographics make-up and voting pattern in this district.



From 2000 to 2013, 78 counties in 19 states, from California to Kansas to North Carolina, flipped from majority white to counties where no single racial or ethnic group is a majority, according to a new Pew Research Center. Of these counties, those in Georgia stand out for having four of the five biggest percentage-point swings in their white-population share.
For example, in Henry County (pop. 211,000 in 2013), 35 miles south of Atlanta, the population’s white share fell from 80.1% in 2000 to 49.8% in 2013. In Gwinnett County (pop. 859,000 in 2013), also near Atlanta, the population dropped from 67.0% white to 41.6% over the same time period.
This trend stems from a flat or declining number of whites in each of these four Georgia counties (Douglas and Rockdale are the other two), combined with a large and growing black population and a smaller Hispanic population that is also increasing in number. (In recent years, many blacks have moved to the Atlanta area from Northern states as part of a return migration to the South.) 

According to facts presented in a Washington Post article from 2014

  • Nonwhites are more Democratic than whites. 
  • The Georgia electorate is becoming more nonwhite. 
  • The share of registered voters in Georgia that is white declined from 72 to 59 percent over the past decade.  
  • Nearly 3 of 4 active registered voters older than 65 are white while less than half of those under 30 are white. 

According to AOL News, May 2016,  eighty-one percent of Georgia's population growth in the past decade came from minorities.